Stories from The Allegheny Front archived under

climate change

Federal Air Rules Bring 'New Normal' for Coal

Bringing coal plants in-line with federal air quality rules is costing the coal industry billions. But environmentalists say the rules will save lives. 

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Your Environment Update for September 3, 2015

A new Penn State University study finds that only about half of all drilling jobs in Pennsylvania go to local residents.

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Your Environment Update for August 27, 2015

Weeks after the release of a new plan to curb carbon emissions from power plants, a new poll shows Pennsylvanians overwhelming back the idea.

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How Healthy Soils Could Reverse Climate Change

Forget expensive carbon sequestration technologies. Nature already has one—it's called photosynthesis. And by promoting healthy soils, we can harness that power to reverse climate change.

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Your Environment Update for August 6, 2015

This week, President Obama released the widely anticipated Clean Power Plan, which seeks to curb climate-altering carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.

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Governor Wolf Backs Obama’s Clean Power Plan

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf says the goals laid out in President Obama's new Clean Power Plan are challenging but achievable.

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Are Black Vultures Expanding Their Range?

Black vultures are common in the southeastern United States. But greater food availability may be a reason they're making their way northward.

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The Pope Sounds Off on Climate Change

Earlier this year, the Pope threw himself into the climate change debate. And many are calling his latest writings nothing short of revolutionary.

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Are This Spring's Big Temperature Swings Normal?

Above-average temps one day. Frost advisories the next. But scientists say climate change isn't the whole story behind this spring's wacky weather.

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85-Year-Old Vet Fasts for Environment

At West Virginia's state capitol, an 85-year-old veteran, Roland Micklem, is on a hunger fast to express his sadness over what he calls "the deteriorating natural environment" that he has witnessed in Appalachia.  Two activists are with him. 

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