Stories from The Allegheny Front archived under

water pollution

Your Environment Update for September 17, 2015

Some members of Pittsburgh's Jewish community are looking to the Three Rivers to help celebrate Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year.

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Water Tasting Contest in West Virginia is No Joke

The 24th Annual International Water Tasting Competition took place recently in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia.  One of the judges was West Virginia Public Broadcasting Executive Director Scott Finn. He lives in Charleston, where his family had to deal with the chemical spill and water crisis earlier this year.  This gave Finn a decidedly different viewpoint as he rated the water.

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Road Salt Impacts Water and Wildlife

There’s no denying it: it’s been a real winter. The cold, snow and ice have meant a lot of work for road crews, trying to keep the streets clear for drivers, and that means a lot of road salt. The Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant looks at what all this salt means for the environment, and examines some alternatives.

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W.Va. Chemical Spill, One Month Later

The chemical that spilled in West Virginia’s Elk River is headed to a site outside Pittsburgh.  That news broke in recent days as hearings were held in West Virginia and Washington, D.C., about legislation to prevent similar accidents. West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Beth Vorhees summarizes legislation in motion, a month after the spill. 

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Dunkard Creek Restoring Itself Faster Than Expected

Dunkard Creek, where a massive fish kill took place in 2009, is recovering more quickly than expected. That's according to a West Virginia fisheries biologist with the Division of Natural Resources. Last summer, the coal company Consol Energy completed a $130 million water treatment plant at the site of the fish kill. Consol paid a fine, but never acknowledged guilt for causing the fish kill.

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News Analysis: What Killed Dunkard Creek?

Most of the aquatic animals that live in a thirty mile stretch of Dunkard Creek died in 2009. The creek runs from Morgantown, West Virginia into Greene County, Pennsylvania. Regulatory investigators spent months trying to figure out what happened.

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PA Chemical Tank Laws Tougher Than West Virginia

The chemical leak at Freedom Industries that left 300,000 people without water in West Virginia brings up questions in other states, like Pennsylvania, about the possibility of other water contamination catastrophes.  Regulators say a spill is less likely here than in West Virginia, but clean water advocates aren't so sure. 

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New Series, 'Ripple Effects: Water Pollution & New Solutions'

Everyone wants clean water—in their taps, in the rivers we increasingly use for swimming and boating, or even just in the valleys we see as we drive around. But what does it take to make our water clean? This week the Allegheny Front begins a series called Ripple Effects: Water Pollution & New Solutions, to explore the latest efforts to clean up our region's waterways.

 

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Research Examines Links Between Runoff and Phosphorus Pollution

Farmers in the Champlain Valley of New York often use tile drains in their fields. They help the region’s clay soil drain faster and produce higher crop yields.  But for years, Lake Champlain has had high levels of phosphorus pollution, which can result in toxic blue-green algae blooms. And farm runoff is one of the primary contributors.

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Energy Roundup: Headlines Fired Up Over Coal, Coal Waste, Natural Gas

It’s been a kind of wild west of energy news—from big coal power plants closing to energy grid officials saying, "Not so fast!  We need that electricity."  And then there is President Obama’s refocused commitment on the environment, but the White House's meddling in the legacy of coal energy’s waste.  The Allegheny Front has a rundown of recent energy news. 

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