Is Climate Change Ruining Summer: A National Wildlife Federation Report

With record heat, widespread drought and massive wildfires hitting parts of the country, the National Wildlife Federation has just released a report that asks a question that many people may be pondering: Is climate change ruining summer?

As kayakers slip into the Allegheny River on Pittsburgh's North Shore, National Wildlife Federation's Ed Perry unveils his group's latest report. Perry tells a cautionary tale about extreme weather and climate change. He says the bass fishery in a hundred mile stretch of the Susquehanna River collapsed in 2005. He says the fish suffered from stressors like pollution and stormwater runoff.

"But the fact is the dying started in the hottest year in the hottest decade and continues to this day."

Perry says fish kills in Pennsylvania will become more common if prolonged heat continues to deprive streams of dissolved oxygen and leave fish susceptible to diseases. Summer crops lost to drought and a rise in pollution caused by heat trapping gas could become the norm. The report, titled "Is Climate Change Ruining Summer" says climate change is changing the odds on extreme weather.

"Climate change is making these events not only more extreme but more frequent," says Perry.

This summer's hot weather has spurred dozens of ozone action days and heat related activity cancellations.

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Transcript

With record heat, widespread drought and massive wildfires hitting parts of the country, the National Wildlife Federation has just released a report that asks a question that many people may be pondering: Is climate change ruining summer?

As kayakers slip into the Allegheny River on Pittsburgh's North Shore, National Wildlife Federation's Ed Perry unveils his group's latest report. Perry tells a cautionary tale about extreme weather and climate change. He says the bass fishery in a hundred mile stretch of the Susquehanna River collapsed in 2005. He says the fish suffered from stressors like pollution and stormwater runoff.

"But the fact is the dying started in the hottest year in the hottest decade and continues to this day."

Perry says fish kills in Pennsylvania will become more common if prolonged heat continues to deprive streams of dissolved oxygen and leave fish susceptible to diseases. Summer crops lost to drought and a rise in pollution caused by heat trapping gas could become the norm. The report, titled "Is Climate Change Ruining Summer" says climate change is changing the odds on extreme weather.

"Climate change is making these events not only more extreme but more frequent," says Perry.

This summer's hot weather has spurred dozens of ozone action days and heat related activity cancellations.